https://alcohol.sa.ucsb.edu/

UCSB Alcohol and Drug Program

About UCSB Alcohol and Drug Program

The UCSB Alcohol & Drug Program strives to create a safe, healthy, and learning-conducive environment through the promotion of healthy choices concerning the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs. The program emphasizes the elimination of harmful use, high-risk behavior and related violence.

Reviews

Lead Intern - Peer Educator

September 2017 Santa Barbara, CA
ā€œI appreciated the opportunity to work intimately with the community to change the party culture here at UCSB. In contrast to other education methods, I truly believe that harm reduction is the most effective approach with college students in particular in order to maintain that the community learns how to party safely and figure out their personal balance if they choose to engage with alcohol or other drugs. The student intern team is a group of highly-motivated, energetic, and engaged people who are all dedicated to minimizing the stigma of safe partying tactics, such as pacing drinks, alternating alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages, and staying hydrated. The Alcohol and Drug Program creates a work environment that is conducive to education, harm reduction, counseling, and recovery services should a student want those services. This position has allowed me to combine my real-world life experiences with scientific studies about drug and alcohol use in order to change the dialogue about the UCSB party dynamic in a positive way that changes the discourse towards one that celebrates our university's rich research prowess and dedication to academic excellence.ā€

LOTP Peer Intern

January 2019 Isla Vista, CA
ā€œLife of the party was the perfect opportunity for me to work on my communication skills. I love the constant interaction that we have with the community in Isla Vista as we deliver our wonderful message of safe partying. In addition, this internship has allowed me to create a strong network with numerous professionals that will benefit me as I apply to medical schools in the future. ā€
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